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Lies Writers Believe (and the Truth that Sets them Free!)

By Danica Favorite

You might recognize the title concept from Susan May Warren’s teaching. The things holding our characters back are often the same things that hold us back as writers and as people. I remember thinking about a few issues in my own life, and the lightbulb kicked on. I believe lies. So much of my personal writing success has been delayed because of lies I believe.

Which is when I started applying the characterization techniques taught by Susan May Warren to my own life. The reason I am not achieving the success in my life, the reason you are not achieving the success you want in your life, is because somewhere deep down, you are believing a lie. Our beliefs are what dictate our actions, and if our actions are founded on faulty beliefs, we will never get the results we want.

What are some of the lies writers believe?

• I’ll never be good enough.
• I’m not as good as X.
• God doesn’t want me to be successful

There are a lot more lies out there, but for the purposes of this blog, let’s focus on these. I encourage you to focus on your own beliefs in the same context, and see how this applies to you.

Lie #1: I’ll never be good enough.

Whoa! Anytime you use the word, “never,” it is a red flag that you’re believing a lie. Words like always and never signal a line of thinking that gives little room for growth. Instead, think of how you can rephrase. My favorite way is to say, “I can learn how…”

The other problem with this line of thinking is the idea of being good enough. For what? We all know that not all published books are good. Not all good books get published. Oftentimes the question of good enough lies in our own self-esteem and definition of what makes us good enough. God doesn’t make inferior products. He made you, and that alone makes you worthy.

Lie #2: I’m not as good as X.

Writers often fall into the deadly comparison trap, and no good can come of it. You are not that other person, and by design, can only be you. God gave you a unique story, so tell your story. Stop trying to write like someone else, or to
compare your journey to theirs. Your path belongs to you, so enjoy your journey.

Lie #3: God doesn’t want me to be successful.

Some of this will depend on your definition of success (which may be a lie that you are believing!), but here’s the nugget of truth to hold on to. Becoming successful with the gift God gave you honors God. He didn’t give you your gift so you could hide it in a closet. He gave it to you to shine. When you shine, it magnifies the glory of God, which is why your success is honoring to Him.

Can you relate to any of these lies? Are there pieces of these lies you might believe? Are there other lies that you believe that are holding you back? Spend some time looking at what you believe about your writing, success, and God. How can you call out the lies you believe and replace them with the truth?

Danica FavoriteMultipublished author Danica Favorite loves the adventure of living a creative life. Living in her dream home in the mountains, Danica is passionate about helping others live their dreams. After all, what fun is living your dreams alone? Visit Danica at her website, www.danicafavorite.com to learn more.

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5 Responses to Lies Writers Believe (and the Truth that Sets them Free!)

  1. Thank you for such good thoughts.

  2. Danica, like most writers, I’m a charter member of the Imposters’ Club, and have lie #2 imprinted on my forehead like a phylactery. But, as you point out, all these lies are just that–lies. And if God only wants one person to read my work, if writing it changes me and no one else ever reads it, then that’s enough to be success in my opinion…and in His. Thanks for sharing.

  3. So glad you found them helpful, Nancy!

  4. Richard, it is SUCH a lie, you’re a wonderful writer, and God is doing great things through you.

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