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2019 Workshop Electives

As part of your conference registration options, you will be given the choice of one of the following Workshop Electives from each of the available time slots.

IMPORTANT NOTE: You are encouraged to study the workshop sessions carefully before registering. In an effort to be as environmentally responsible as possible, handouts for sessions will not be available onsite. You’ll receive handouts for your sessions via email the week prior to conference. If you purchase the complete syllabus, that electronic copy will be included in your registration packet.

Workshop Elective Session 1: Friday - 9:30am - 10:30am

WS 01: Indie Publishing that Sells Books
Meeting Room Rio Grade East
Presented by: Misty Beller
Level: All
Prerequisites:
Description -

The holistic approach to publishing and connecting with readers to build a thriving career and touch lives.


Workshop Outline -

Through this course, attendees will learn how to create a detailed self-publishing plan and timeline to include the components of publishing and marketing a new release. Topics covered include:
• How to find the right members of your publishing team (editing, cover design, formatting, and more)
• Distributors for ebook and print (including KDP Select vs. “going wide”)
• Preorders
• Creating your product page
• Keywords & categories
• Your marketing plan
• Analyzing the book launch and planning for the future
• Strategies for series
• Bookkeeping
• Writing as a career


Information Video:-



WS 02: From Frankenstein to Jamie Fraser:
How to create characters who breathe
Presented by: Susan May Warren and Tari Faris
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Learn how to build epic characters - an advanced class.


Workshop Outline -

How to create characters who breathe (and step off the pages and inhabit your hearts) A great character isn’t just pieced together. He is birthed from the creator’s heart. He lives and breathes and walks onto the page fully formed. But how do you, as the creator, discover this character? In this innovative class, USA Today best-selling author Susan May Warren, and debut novelist Tari Faris will unlock and merge two powerful character-building systems – the Story Equation and the Enneagram Personality system - to help authors birth and grow up their characters until they start walking, talking and taking over the page…and your heart.

An organic, advanced class on characterization that will help you build bigger, better and bolder stories.


Information Video:-



WS 03: Managing Your Street Team

Presented by: DiAnn Mills
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Every writer needs a street team to help reach readers and potential readers through the team’s community of influence, but writers need to properly care and manage their team.


Workshop Outline -

I. What is a Street Team

II. Why does a writer need a street team?

III. Who makes up a street team?

IV. Where does a writer find a street team
Explain letter in handout

V. Care and Management of the team
What the writer does for the team exceeds what the writer expects from the team.
What does the street team do?
How does the writer help the team?
Initiating contests and giveaways for the street team.
How often does the writer communicate with the team?
Remembering street team on special occasions
Explain Spreadsheet handout
Keeping the street team informed
Gratitude first
Encouragement for the team and the writer


Information Video:-



WS 04: Dynamic Dialogue

Presented by: Allie Pleiter
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Strong dialogue is the vital key to a great book—learn how to give your characters the words, tones, and voices that can make your story soar. Sure, dialogue records conversation.  But it can do so much more—if you know how to wield it.  Dialogue can provide subtle backstory, vivid characterization, or shoot a plot forward at high speed.  Great dialogue is memorable and effective.  Bad dialogue is cumbersome and can turn your reader (or potential editor) off quickly.  Multi-published author Allie Pleiter leads you through all the ways you can use dialogue within your story to pack a far bigger punch than “she said.”


Workshop Outline -

-Dialogue’s Basic Uses

-Dialogue’s Common Misuses

-Advanced Tactics

-Quick Hacks to Improve Your Dialogue Instantly

-Why Strong Dialogue Matters


Information Video:-



WS 05: Your Story’s Sacred Circle

Presented by: Allen Arnold
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

If your story is stuck and you’re spinning your wheels, it’s time to understand the power of A Story’s Sacred Circle. Just as the concentric color rings of a bulls-eye have unique values, so do the circles of Story. Discover the secret of the center ring - and the unique power and challenges of the outer rings in this transformative workshop.

 


Workshop Outline -

Information Video:-



Workshop Elective Session 2: Friday - 11:00am - noon

WS 06: How to Decide Between Traditional and Indie Publishing

Presented by: Rachelle Gardner
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

How to decide if you should go the traditional or indie route in the publishing industry.


Workshop Outline -

Information Video:-



WS 07: From Frankenstein to Jamie Fraser:
Part 2
Presented by: Susan May Warren and Tari Faris
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Part 2 of the session


Workshop Outline -

Information Video:-



WS 08: Tips and Techniques of Scrivener

Presented by: Lynn Blackburn
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

This overview of the popular writing software will highlight the unique and powerful tools that have made Scrivener an indispensable part of the novel writing process for plotters, pantsers, and everyone in between.


Workshop Outline -

Information Video:-



WS 09: Mastering the Art of Plotting

Presented by: DiAnn Mills
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Mastering the Art of Plotting shows the writer how to create a dynamic storyline that moves the story from the slush pile into the “I love it” category.


Workshop Outline -

I. The goal of the writer is to create the unexpected yet real story.

II. Difference between a premise and a concept

III. The story question rises out of the character’s wants and needs Establishing Point of View - Who has the most to lose? Exploring various Points of View

IV. Designing the essential hook.
Using hooks at the end and beginning of scenes.

V. Stress, Tension, and Conflict
The Antagonistic Setting

VI. The difference between inner and outer conflict. Which is more important?
Examples of conflict

VII. The 4 plot questions
What is the POV character’s goal or problem?
What does the POV character learn that he/she didn’t know before.
What backstory is revealed? (try not to insert for the first 50 pages)
How are the stakes raised?

VIII. What is essential in the beginning

VIX. What is essential in the middle
How to avoid the sagging middle.
Choices and other solutions

X. Resolution


Information Video:-



WS 10: Revelation of Jesus in Fiction

Presented by: Rachel Hauck
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Writing creative, unique fiction that brings a revelation of Jesus.


Workshop Outline -

Information Video:-



Workshop Elective Session 3: Friday - 2:00pm - 3:00pm

WS 11: Legal Landmines for Indies

Presented by: Rick Acker
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -
Workshop Outline -
Information Video:-


WS 12: Right Brain Writing

Presented by: Angela Hunt
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Learn how to cultivate the “right brain” aspects of your writing: plotting, deepening characters, inserting theme, creating a unique setting, and testing the work-ability of your story idea.


Workshop Outline -

Information Video:-



WS 13: EXTRA, EXTRA, READ ALL ABOUT IT!

Presented by: Hallee Bridgeman
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

You don’t have to have a marketing degree to successfully understand and navigate marketing your books.


Workshop Outline -

Information Video:-



WS 14: Writing Page-Turning Tension

Presented by: Carrie Stuart Parks
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Learn to inject your novel with page-turning tension that readers will remember long after they’ve finished the last page.


Workshop Outline -

Proposal Outline: Using actual examples, this hand-on session will show writers how to bring out the power and tension in their story. Participants will learn:
-What to avoid and where.
-Finding the power of their voice.
-Pacing.
-Easy fixes.
Participants will come away with exciting tools to make their manuscripts shine.


Information Video:-



WS 15: Dodge the Darts
Protecting Your Soul from Satan's Author Arsenal
Presented by: Karen Witemeyer
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

This interactive workshop will sharpen spiritual reflexes to help us combat some of Satan’s favorite weapons for waging war on an author’s soul: discouragement, pride, envy, greed, doubt, laziness, and burnout.


Workshop Outline -

Part One: Defining the Darts (Karen shares about when she is most susceptible to each of these.)
1. Discouragement
2. Pride
3. Envy
4. Greed
5. Doubt
6. Laziness
7. Burnout

Part Two: Know Your Enemy
1. He prowls like a stalking lion and will strike when we are most vulnerable
2. Deception is everywhere – Rationalization, denial, buying in to worldly wisdom
3. He delights in twisting godly character into a sinful mindset
a. Humility into Discouragement and Doubt
b. Calling/Giftedness into Pride
c. Striving to Give our Best/Ambition into Greed, Envy
d. Trust in His provision into Laziness
e. Working as if for the Lord into Burnout

Part Three: Combatting the Foe
1. Recognize the writing cycle and which darts you are most susceptible to at the different stages.
a. When starting a new project – Doubt, Burnout
b. Midstream - Laziness
c. Nearing deadline – Discouragement/Worry
d. Completion – Pride
e. Release date – Doubt, Pride
f. Good reviews, contest finals – Pride
g. Bad reviews, rejections – Discouragement
h. Seeing the success of others – Envy
i. Contract negotiation – Greed, Doubt, Pride

2. Utilize your armor
a. Shield of Faith and Sword of Truth (Ephesians 6:10-17)Verses to combat each dart – faith to believe in the promises (see handout)
b. Trust your commander – you are not alone on the field of battle (2 Chronicles 20:15-17; 2 Kings 6:15-17)
c. Stand firm (1 Corinthians 15:58; 1 Corinthians 16:13; 2 Corinthians 1:21-22)
d. If you find yourself a prisoner of war, don’t despair. God has an escape plan in place. (1 Corinthians 10:11-13; Hebrews 2:18; John 16:33; 1 John 4:4)

3. Get support from brothers & sisters in arms
a. Seek prayer (Psalm 68:19-20a; Galatians 6:2)
b. Share struggles with God and others (1 John 1:8-9; James 5:16)

Part Four: Form small groups, share struggles and pray for each other.


Information Video:-



Workshop Elective Session 4: Friday - 3:30pm - 4:30pm

WS 16: Character Wounds

Presented by: Tara Johnson
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

This workshop will explore a variety of character wounds, how they impact human behavior, and will equip the writer in building complex characters, deep conflict, and intriguing spiritual threads to take their stories from “good” to captivating.


Workshop Outline -

-Introduction: First story that ever captured you?

Story is about how the things that happen in the plot affect the protagonist, and how he or she changes internally as a result.

Character:
It’s not what the world throws at them. It’s the meaning they read into those events that tells us what the story is really about.

Page 1 of your story:
    *Unavoidable conflict that will matter to your protagonist
    *What specific plan will that conflict topple?
    *What internal fear will it force her/him to confront?
    *What long held desire will it force him/her to go after?

-Key to character (and their internal conflict) is found in their past.

-Just as important as those character sheets are with external detail (eye color, hair color, family background, etc.), it’s even more important to ask “why” they behave as they do.

-Wound definition

Common Wounds:
-insecurity -rejection   -abuse
-betrayal -feeling worthless -abandonment
-feeling unloved -fear   -shame

Knowing your characters’ wound(s), will greatly affect their internal and external goals, motivation and conflict.

-Misbelief:
Misbelief feels identical to truth. It feels right, even true, because at one moment in our life, it was true. It’s a clue we receive growing up that tells us how the world seems to work. These misbeliefs then shape our worldview. Filter through which we all see things.

When we dig into our characters’ pasts, we must know what conclusion he/she drew about human nature in that moment. That became her default belief ever since.

-Brief Brainstorming Time: 3 pivotal beliefs in your character’s past

1.
2.
3.

-When does your novel start? (Wound determines it.)
When life will no longer allow your protagonist to put off going after that thing he’s long wanted, regardless of how much his misbelief wants him to sit in fear. Change, internally or otherwise, is an unavoidable external force.

-Weaving wounds into plots:
When we understand our characters’ wounds, as well as their misbeliefs, we can mold a plot that forces them to confront those misbeliefs through external plot, expose their wounds through internal plot, and weave the entire story together with a spiritual thread of redemption that points the reader to the transformative power of Christ.

-The Emotional Wound Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Psychological Trauma
by Ackerman & Puglisi.


Information Video:-



WS 17: Exercising the Left Brain

Presented by: Angela Hunt
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

(This is a part 2 to the other submission that focused on the right brain aspects of writing.  The first workshop is on the creative aspect; this workshop is on the editorial aspects.)

Learn how to take your rough draft and apply your left-brain skills—aka your editorial eye and ears—to hone and polish your manuscript by using point of view as an effective tool, cutting weasel words, adding “mood music,” creating tension in every scene, evoking emotion, and finding time to write.


Workshop Outline -

Information Video:-



WS 18: From Press Releases to Pitches:
Keys to Marketing Your Book to the Media
Presented by: Liz Johnson
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Whether you’re traditionally or independently published, you’ll gain the tools to position yourself for maximum media coverage when the time is right.


Workshop Outline -

Spreading the word about your book can be just as stressful as writing it. It doesn’t have to be.

The media used to welcome the opportunity to cover new book releases. But over the last 25 years, media coverage for authors has dwindled. So how’s an author supposed to spread the word about their books beyond social media
and digital marketing? Whether you write fiction or nonfiction, Liz will help you identify key ways to position your message to reach the right media audiences.

She’ll help you:
- Identify your book’s unique angles
- Research and target the most promising media outlets
- Perfect your two key tools—press release and pitch
- Prepare to support and maximize your publicist’s efforts

Whether you’re traditionally or independently published, you’ll gain the tools to position yourself for maximum media coverage when the time is right.


Information Video:-



WS 19: Bigger, Better, Bolder:
Writing the Super Novel
Presented by: Susan May Warren
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Learn how to write stories that transcend genre to become bestsellers and make a life-changing impact on your readers.


Workshop Outline -

How do you write stories that transcend genre to become bestsellers and make a life-changing impact on your readers?

The Thorne Birds. The Pillars of the Earth. Roots. The Princess Bride. ShoGun. Carrie. The Kite Runner. The Time Travelers Wife. The DaVinci Code. Gone Girl. The Hunger Games.

All blockbuster books. All different genres. These books are called Super Novels. They transcend genre, demographics and time. Why? In this workshop we’ll break down the super novel. We’ll discover the elements common to
all these stories –and more, isolate them and dissect why they work. Then we’ll learn how to add these elements into our novels to create our own Super Novel. Applicable to all genres.


Information Video:-



WS 20: Weaving Spiritual Themes Into Your Novel

Presented by: Tessa Afshar
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Learn to craft profound stories that have the power to transform the lives of your readers.


Workshop Outline -

As Christians, we have access to core truths about life. We are the guardians of key knowledge to the character of God and the nature of human beings. We understand how to live a fruitful and satisfying life. The more of this knowledge we release into our stories, the more life we give our readers. Weaving Spiritual Themes is a short version of Tessa’s popular seven-hour course by the same name. Participants will receive teachings on three spiritual themes and have the opportunity to put them into practice through writing exercises. We will focus on expressing spiritual themes without being preachy or predictable.


Information Video:-



Workshop Elective Session 5: Saturday - 9:30am - 10:30am

WS 21: Sage Advice for Storytellers

Presented by: Allen Arnold and Frank Peretti
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

The ever-changing world of publishing can leave writers wondering what success looks like. In this free-flowing, candid conversation, best-selling author Frank Peretti and Frank’s former Christian Fiction Publisher Allen Arnold offer timeless wisdom on what matters most. The workshop wraps up with a lightning round Q&A.


Workshop Outline -



WS 22: From Query to Publication
And Everything In Between
Presented by: Rachelle Gardner
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

From query to publication, and everything in between in the writer’s journey


Workshop Outline -



WS 23: How To Keep Publishing in this Ever-Changing Industry

Presented by: Tamela Hancock Murray
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Literary Agent Tamela Hancock Murray shares ideas and strategies on how to start your career and keep it healthy regardless of where the market lands at any given time.

 

 


Workshop Outline -

1.  Know yourself.

2.  Know your readers.

3.  Know the line if you’re writing for category. Read the line.

4.  Know the genre if writing for trade (and category as well).

5.  Know the rules for any type of writing. (Yes, there are stories about breaking the rules and you can, but not entirely. For instance, a debut author is unlikely to find a traditional publisher for a ten-volume set of 300,000-word stories.)

Then:

1.  Choose an agent you connect with.

2.  Stay in touch with the agent.

3.  Let the agent know your career needs. (I need a break. I need more money. I’m upset with my editor. I love my editor…)

4.  Be ready to move when your agent says an editor wants you to submit quickly.

5.  Be honest with your agent about what your workload can be.

And:

1.  Keep up the quality of your work. Never slack off.

2.  Research. Research. Research.

3.  Never take your readers for granted.

4.  Answer fan mail with cheer and gratitude.

5.  Be flexible. Opportunities can come up in strange places and odd times.

6.  If an idea is turned down, work with your agent to repurpose the idea.

7.  Write! Write! Write!




WS 24: Character Tricks

Presented by: Cara Putman
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

In character tricks, writers will learn how to add dimension and layers to their characters through tools like the Enneagram, Five Love Languages, Myers Briggs, and many other tools. Add these to internal, external, and spiritual layers, and characters will grow to be the type that feel like a friend and stay with a reader long after they reach “The End.”


Workshop Outline -



WS 25: The Killer Book Proposal

Presented by: Steve Laube
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Elements of a proposal that attract the eye of an editor


Workshop Outline -



Workshop Elective Session 6: Saturday - 11:00am - noon

WS 26: Market a New Book Release

Presented by: Misty Beller
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Learn step-by-step strategies to supercharge your new book release.


Workshop Outline -

Learn the comprehensive approaches to reach both previous fans and new readers during a book launch. We’ll cover topics such as:
• Prerequisites to a solid launch
• Growing and utilizing your email list
• Your websites and social media sharing
• Building and empowering your launch team
• Blog tours
• Paid advertising
• Launch parties
• Postmortems
• How to choose your strategy for a debut release, first in a series, standalone, or later book in a series.




WS 27: Movie Matters:
An Agent’s View of the Book-to-Film Process
Presented by: Jessica Kirkland
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Have you ever dreamed of having your book turned into a movie? Or maybe you’ve wanted to write an original screenplay and option it to your dream production company? Join Jessie Kirkland of Kirkland Media Management as she teaches about her journey from literary agent, to scriptwriter, to producing partner at Victress Pictures. In this class, she’ll teach you basic rules of engagement, about some opportunities for CBA writers, and what to expect as your book moves from the book to the screen.


Workshop Outline -



WS 28: Don’t Think You Need an Agent? Think Again!

Presented by: Tamela Hancock Murray
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

1.) Etiquette. Of course you’re polite. But questions specific to this industry and are asked only by writers come up.
2.) Handling more than one publisher.
3.) Handling a hybrid career.
4.) Taking on the tough tasks such as deadline extensions.
5.) Asking ALL the money questions. So you don’t have to!
6.) Keeping your payments on track. It’s amazing how many times checks don’t get processed. Editors are not evil, just overworked and sometimes need reminders!
7.) Keeping your career progress on track. Money, workload, publishers.
8.) Answering all your questions. This is new to you, but I’ve seen everything at least 5 times. And in the rare case I haven’t, Steve has!


Workshop Outline -



WS 29: Contracts

Presented by: Rick Acker
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Attorney and veteran author Rick Acker explains the key terms of traditional publishing contracts and their indie counterparts in the KDP terms of service.


Workshop Outline -



WS 30: Stupid Author Tricks

Presented by: Panel
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

When it comes to working in the publishing world, we’ve all made mistakes, and we all have regrets—things we’d do differently if we had a second chance. Learn from—and laugh at—these authors’ honest mistakes and stupid blunders and maybe you’ll be able to avoid some of the pitfalls of being a writer.


Workshop Outline -



Workshop Elective Session 7: Saturday - 2:00pm - 3:00pm

WS 31: Bring Your Backlist to Life

Presented by: Misty Beller
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

With a few new tools, your backlist can spring to life and find a whole new readership.


Workshop Outline -

A career of writing means you likely have a solid “book inventory.” Whether you’re a traditionally published author getting your rights back, or an indie author seeking to increase monthly income, your older published works don’t need to languish any longer. With the variety of tools available to authors today, it’s never been easier to reinvigorate your backlist with a whole new readership. In this course, we’ll unpack some of those options:

New covers (And how not to confuse readers)

Kindle Unlimited – a great discoverability tool

Box sets – the advertiser’s friend

Email automation – the selling engine behind the scenes

Can your standalones become a series?




WS 32: Redeeming Rejection:
Turning Pain into Pleasure
Presented by: Steve Laube
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Crucial discussion of the realities of rejection - The whys, hows, and what nows of rejection


Workshop Outline -



WS 33: Your Process, Your Writing

Presented by: Panel
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

In Your Process, Your Writing a panel of authors will show that there isn’t one right way to write a book. Instead, they will share a host of tips on how to find a process that will work for you with your book. And encourage you to stay flexible when the story won’t cooperate. With a host of tools, your process will make your writing easier to accomplish.


Workshop Outline -



WS 34: Creativity from Chaos

Presented by: Allen Arnold
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Writers love throwing chaos at their characters. But as artists, chaos can derail us. Rather than being used by chaos, discover how to use it as your canvas for creative breakthrough. For every writer who has ever felt overwhelmed, defeated, or in a holding pattern, this workshop will calm your heart and jumpstart your art.

 


Workshop Outline -



WS 35: Brave New Christian Fiction World: Industry Panel

Presented by: Panel
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

ACFW’s industry guests discuss what they’re seeing, what they hope to see, and the role of courage in Christian fiction’s authors, publishers, and content.


Workshop Outline -



Workshop Elective Session 8: Saturday - 3:30pm - 4:30pm

WS 36: Small Edits, Big Impact

Presented by: Robin Patchen
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

Learn how to use rhetorical devices and other simple tricks to improve the emotional impact of your prose. Each device will have examples from speeches, literature, and movies to illustrate how they can be used in all kinds of writing.


Workshop Outline -

Outline:

• Your voice matters, and rhetorical devices transcend genre
• Twelve little-known rhetorical devices (from anaphora and zeugma) described with examples
• Six rarely discussed editing secrets with examples of each
• Mistakes to avoid in your writing
• How to put these things into practice




WS 37: Better Together—Developing a Plotting Society

Presented by: Christy Barritt, Connilyn Cossette, Nicole Deese, Tammy Gray
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

A teaching panel made up of five award-winning authors will share their best-kept secrets and strategies on how they collectively plot a minimum of ten books during their annual retreats while encouraging other writers to build successful writing communities of their own.


Workshop Outline -

During the workshop/panel, each author will spend a few minutes on their given topics before answering questions from the audience:
Retreat logistics/ Time management and plot strategy- Tammy Gray
Efficient brainstorming/Character development—Connilyn Cossette
Idea organization/Story hooks—Christy Barritt
How a pantser plots with a group—Amy Matayo
Healthy group dynamics/ Relationship building—Nicole Deese




WS 38: Inkling to Ink: Creative Structure

Presented by: James Hannibal
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

From Inkling to Ink shows you how to take a single idea and build it into a complete story outline that connects with the “story beats” ingrained by our Creator in all of us.


Workshop Outline -

Inkling to Ink is an interactive program, during which the class and I take a single idea—conflict, hero, villain, time, place, or theme—and brainstorm a complete story outline. The “story beats” method draws multiple well-known structural aids, including the Hero’s Journey and the Elements of Story. Writing coaches like Christopher Vogler and Larry Brooks have drawn from the work of Joseph Campbell (The Hero with a Thousand Faces, 1949) who noticed that there are common points inherent in the stories from all times and all cultures. What they seem to have missed is that these common points, ingrained in all of us like the musical beats of a shared symphony, point us toward the ultimate
story of loving Creator who desires a relationship with His creations.




WS 39: I Need a Hero

Presented by: Pepper Basham
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

A review of the best heroes in films and books what makes them ‘heroic’ and memorable.


Workshop Outline -

In this workshop, we’ll discuss various hero types, using popular heroes from movies and books, to show what sorts of heroes work in fiction, and particularly for certain genres. This workshop focuses on male heroes with a second workshop that features heroines. If needed, this workshop can incorporate bot. We will discuss the definition of a hero, story questions to ask when creating a hero, and 6 basic hero-types- how they ‘play out’ in movies and fiction, and how the fit within the bigger story of a novel.




WS 40: Elements of Smile:
Winning Readers with Humor
Presented by: Karen Witemeyer and Regina Jennings
Level:
Prerequisites:
Description -

No matter what genre you write, humor can add a spark of life to your manuscript that will gain an editor’s notice and win your readers’ hearts.


Workshop Outline -

1. Setting Up Your Story for Maximum Comedic Potential.
a. What is Your H/H Lacking?
b. Fish Out of Water Stories
c. Interesting and Unusual Professions for your H/H
d. Funny Inciting Incidents
e. Embarrassing Backstory That Will Be Revealed

2. Situational Comedy
a. Physical gags
b. Props
c. Location
d. The Cute Meet

3. The Reversal Principle
a. Adults become Children
b. Sophistication turns to Silliness
c. Humans become Mechanical
d. Urban goes Wild
e. Feminine becomes Masculine

4. Banter and witty dialogue


5. Quirky Secondary Characters - Crotchety Elders and Precocious Children and everything in between.


6. Humorous Character Voice - Deep POV.


7. Funny Analogies - Add freshness and fun with humorous comparisons.


8. Adding Conflict Without Going Too Dark
a. What’s embarrassing?
b. What’s unexpected?
c. The Fortunate Fall – H/H see each other at their worst, but it brings them closer together

9. Where to find inspiration - family, friends, TV/movies/books.
a. People watching
b. TV/movies/books
c. Pay attention to what makes people laugh and what flops
d. Don’t steal jokes, steal formulas. Note the concept that works and give it your own unique spin.






You must be at least 18 years old to attend conference without a parent/guardian present with you at all times.

Participation of an individual presenter, agent, editor, or publisher in the ACFW conference does not constitute endorsement by ACFW. Conference attendees are advised to use due diligence and take personal responsibility when choosing industry professionals with whom to schedule appointments or enter into agreement.